Getting the most impact from user experience

Over the past 10-15 years, the practice of user experience within organisations has matured significantly. But why do some organisations get more benefit from UX than others?

The answer stems from how UX is positioned within the organisation, how the organisation measures the success of its investments, and how UX groups seek impact. Those who report having a high degree of impact behave differently to those with low impact.

Continue reading “Getting the most impact from user experience”

The thought before the click: the locus of attention

This is the second in a series of fundamental user experience concepts useful for understanding people’s behaviour when using the web and mobile.

Scrabble Pieces VectorLet’s play a little game.

  1. First, think of your first name.
  2. Now, think of the last letter of your surname.

Neither of these are difficult tasks, but it takes longer to complete the second than the first. This is an illustration of the difference between conscious and unconscious thought. While your first name springs to mind immediately, you had to work a bit harder to come up with the last letter of your surname.

Meanwhile, when you were completing the tasks you had to switch your attention from this page to the task and back again. In doing this, you had to adjust what’s called your “locus of attention”.

Continue reading “The thought before the click: the locus of attention”

The paradox of the active user

This is the first in a series of fundamental user experience concepts useful for understanding people’s behaviour when using the web and mobile.

The paradox of the active user is a concept that was first articulated by John Carroll and Mary Beth Rosson in 1987 at IBM’s User Interface Institute [PDF].  It describes a phenomenon that is ever-present, and still relevant to the way that people use the web and mobile devices today.

Continue reading “The paradox of the active user”

Data-driven decisions? Yes, but please understand the data first

Wherever you look in digital, data is the new black. Big data, smart data, data that helps make you the hero, rather than having to bow to the opinions of the “HIPPO” – the Highest Paid Person’s Opinion.

dilbert dashboard

However, working with a couple of clients over the past few weeks has been a stark reminder that data on the web is not always what it seems.

Continue reading “Data-driven decisions? Yes, but please understand the data first”

Turning management upside down

“Industrial age” management – that which has been in place since the Industrial Revolution – models all kinds of work endeavours as factories. Managers must set direction, define processes and achieve consistency of outcome. Staff must demonstrate competency and deliver what they are told to deliver, otherwise they will be “performance managed”.

In contrast, leading proponents of new styles of management are arguing for ‘autonomy over automatons’. This is particularly prescient in a time when many are predicting that robots and artificial intelligence technologies will take jobs away from humans.

In his recent post, Simon Terry argues that the new role of the manager is not to reduce variation in the work and increase consistency, it is quite the opposite.

“Too many managers can be replaced with robots because of the predictable nature of the algorithm at the heart of their work.  Worse, those who suppress variation in their teams will be left behind in the disruptive economies ahead.”

Read on for more…